Cameroonian Proverbs and sayings 2021

The list of exciting proverbs in the Cameroonian language is enormous, comprising more than two hundred and forty unique quotes. These are generally referred to as folk sayings and are grouped according to their topicality or relevancy. A few other sayings that can be found in the vocabulary of the Cameroons are ‘the grass is always greener on the other side,’ ‘the evening is a time for learning new things,’ ‘if you have a will to learn, the world is your oyster,’ and ‘the pen is mightier than the sword.

You come with a cat and call it a rabbit.

You come with a cat and call it a rabbit.

Cameroonian Proverb

Better a mistake at the beginning than at the end.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

What you don't know, you will not recognize.

What you don’t know, you will not recognize.

Cameroonian Proverb

A bird that allows itself to be caught will find a way of escaping.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

An elephant will reach to the roof of the house.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

Thought is free.

Thought is free.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

A cherry year, a merry year; a plum year, a dumb year.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

A chattering bird builds no nest.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

Thought breaks the heart.

Thought breaks the heart.

Cameroonian Proverb

Every smart man is an ignoramus who abuses his ignorance.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

A friend is worth more than a brother.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

The elephant will reach to the roof of the house.

The elephant will reach to the roof of the house.

Cameroonian Proverb

If love is a sickness, patience is the remedy.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

However little you think of the elephant, you can’t say it won’t fill a pot.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

He who asks questions cannot avoid the answers.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

There is no doctor on the day you die.

There is no doctor on the day you die.

Cameroonian Proverb

If you do not step on the dog’s tail, he will not bite you.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

Sayings and quotes of Cameroonia


If the panther knew how much he is feared, he would do much more harm.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

If the fight is tomorrow, why then clench your fist today.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

The heart of the wise man lies quiet like limpid water.

The heart of the wise man lies quiet like limpid water.

Cameroonian Proverb

The fire cannot be put out with your hands.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

The day did not know that night had fallen.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

Beauty is an empty calabash.

Beauty is an empty calabash.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

The darkness of night cannot stop the light of morning.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

It is the pot that boils but the dish that gets the credit.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

Better little than too little.

Better little than too little.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

By trying often, the monkey learns to jump from the tree.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

It is better to be the victim of injustice than to be unjust yourself.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

A building of sand falls as you build it.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

Water always finds a way out.

Water always finds a way out.

CAMEROONIAN PROVERB

About Cameroonian Proverbs

Many of the most popular and most well-known phrases and sayings in the language are initially British originating. There is no better example of that than in the Cameroonian Proverb. This adage essentially says, “The people of Britain are forever improving.” Indeed, it would appear to be an eternal affirmation of improvement, progress, and the ability of man to improve upon himself.

The expression has been around for a long time and has recently been used by the band Muse. Muse is from Scotland, and their song “Belly Dance” contains the chorus, “We are the people of celluloid.” So yes, the phrase refers specifically to the culture in which they reside, but the origin is almost certainly Briton. Many other common variations of this saying: “Nemo est enlige,” which means “not yet equal.”

These are very common Cameroonian Proverbs, which Cameroonians often quote. Another variation of this idiom is “quod vide, sed et exercise,” which means “let us exercise and see.” This idiom is prevalent in the United Kingdom and has even made its way into the dictionary under the similar heading, “exercise.”

Related Topics

Leave a Reply